Browsing tag

mountain bikes

Throwback Thursday: Bikes, tires and drivetrain innovations from 1988

Fisher’s Pro Caliber bike offered a Prestige-tubed TIG-welded frame, Fisher Fattrax 26×2.02-inch tires, and Shimano’s Deore XT components. A Hite-Rite seat spring (the precursor to the dropper posts of today) allowed riders to raise or lower the saddle while still riding, completing the package. “Do you want to do some serious climbing?” That was the […]

Throwback Thursday: Bikes, people and products of 1988

The Trimble Carbon Cross was a stab at the future by designer Brett Trimble. The bike offered a molded, monocoque, carbon fiber frame that weighed only 4 pounds, the lightest frame we had tested up to that time, in 1988. The complete bike weighed 23 pounds. Expert rider Jimmy Donnell looked so much like John […]

Throwback Thursday: High-Tech Mountain Bikes and Components from August 1988

Klein was one of the premier bike brands in America in those days. The company was famous for building extremely light, top-quality road bikes (thanks in large part to the use of oversized, thin-wall tubing), and they brought that technology to the mountain bike market. Since front suspension wouldn’t be introduced to mountain bikes until […]

Throwback Thursday: The Bikes of 1991

We were digging through our files and we came upon an envelope with photos from Mountain Bike Action’s 1991 Buyer’s Guide. Inside was this classic shot of long-time staffers Sean McCoy and Zapata Espinoza ripping downhill on a Moots titanium tandem bike.   The Alpinestars Cro-Mega had a fairly exotic form to distinguish it from […]

Throwback Thursday: July 1988

The Specialized Stumpjumper Epic of 1988 had carbon fiber frame tubes and Biopace chainrings. They only made 400 of this model that year. It was priced at $2400. We’re not sure now who the test rider was on the Stumpjumper Epic, but he definitely had good balance. In our article introducing recent converts to the […]

Carbon vs. Aluminum

Bike parts are lighter and offer better performance than ever. The gains are largely due to improvements in material technology, such as switching from metal to carbon fiber parts. These lighter and “better” parts come with a bit of uncertainty, though. It has long been rumored that carbon parts can suddenly and unexpectedly fail if […]